Römerquelle mineral water will soon be available in Hungary in bottles made of 100% percent recycled plastic. The motto on its label, „Bottle made of bottle” means that Römerquelle packaging had a previous life: it was produced by collecting and recyling waste bottles. And since they are 100% recyclable, consumers may also contribute to starting a new cycle. These so-called rePets are a novelty in Hungary, so this initiative is a significant step in the sustainability strategy of The Coca‑Cola Company, to whose portfolio this brand of mineral water belongs. On this occasion, Pajta Restaurant in the region of Őrség won the Römerquelle - Dining Guide Sustainability Prize.

This mineral water – coming from a 5300 year old source in Burgenland – was only available in Hungary in glass bottles and in restaurants, but from May 2020, it will also be sold in so-called rePET bottles in stores. This means that it is poured into packaging thrown out, collected and 100% recycled; this reduces the amount of single-use plastic thrown into the garbage. The PET bottles of The Coca‑Cola Company distributed in Hungary are all 100% recyclable but this is the first time that they introduce packaging that not only becomes a bottle once again – it has already been one, at least once.

Soft drink and mineral water in rePET bottles is a novelty on the Hungarian market. In the portfolio of Coca‑Cola Hungary, the average amount of recycled plastic used for bottles is 24% but this number is constantly growing. The fact that the company will soon offer one of its products in 100% recycled bottles is in perfect harmony with the World Without Waste strategy. The aim of this strategy – among other things – is to collect as many plastic bottles and aluminium cans by 2030 as the amount sold; and to produce all bottles from 50% recycled material by the same date.

Consumers may also help protecting the environment by choosing environmentally conscious products and by supporting collection. If they put recycled waste into selective garbage collectors, less plastic turns out to be single-use.